The ADA law that the Court used is a sleeper, and most businesses are unaware of it, including ADA attorneys.  It is so vague that your average business owner and/or operator would not have known of about it.  Pursuant to 42. U.S.C. sec. 36.302 (a), the ADA provides that a business (public accommodation) “shall” make reasonable modifications in policies and procedures, when they are necessary to afford equal access and enjoyment to the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, or accommodations to the disabled unless the business can demonstrate that making the modification would “fundamentally alter” the nature of its goods, services and operations. 

The Court used the “policy and procedure” requirement to rule that the dealership was liable for the plaintiff's emotional damages, ordered the entity to have hand controls and awarded the plaintiff her attorneys’ fees and costs.

DO YOU HAVE A WRITTEN POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL TO ACCOMMODATE YOUR DISABLED CUSTOMERS/PATRONS?

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Call Ms. Catherine M. Corfee, who prepares written policies and procedures for all businesses to comply with the ADA

Catherine M. Corfee, Esq. is an ADA attorney and on the cutting edge of ADA law, its trends, defenses, and/or strategies.  Call 916-487-5441 for a Consultation.

More Details on the Case:

CAR AUTOThe Plaintiff was paralyzed from the waist down, sought to test-drive one of the used cars offered for sale by an automobile dealership. He asked the employees “for the opportunity to test drive a vehicle and informed them that he could not use his legs and, therefore, needed to have vehicle hand controls temporarily installed on the vehicle so that he could avail himself of this opportunity.” The employees told Plaintiff that Defendant “does not install vehicle hand controls on any vehicles for sale and that they would not do so for him as an accommodation.

 The Plaintiff argued that, “[t]here are numerous companies that sell (and will install) vehicle hand controls that are universal in design, meaning that they can be used on any vehicle, and their installation does not render any safety features inoperable or cause any permanent modification or damage to the vehicle itself.” “Such hand controls are inexpensive, are widely used within the car rental agency world for temporary installation and removal, and could be easily installed by [Defendant] without much difficulty or expense.”  And the evidence of such was submitted to the Court.

The Ninth Circuit Court ruled that offering inexpensive hand controls to enable the disabled (in wheelchairs) to test drive a case was a policy/procedure that the dealership should have modified and allowed. 

 CONCLUSION/POINT: 

Businesses, and auto dealerships, must do and think as the Court ruled:  “Public accommodations must start by considering how their facilities are used by non-disabled guests and then take reasonable steps to provide disabled guests with a like experience.

AUTO DEALERSHIPS AVOID AN ADA LAWSUIT

Corfee Stone – Catherine M. Esq., an ADA access Attorney

Serving Northern and Southern California

916-487-5441 * catherine@corfeestone.com

P.O. Box 1098

Carmichael, CA 95608

 

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